CLIMATE WEEK in Honiton 2013

Transition Town Honiton (TTH) are planning to mark national Climate Week for the second year running with two exciting local events. Climate Week is a national occasion that offers an annual renewal of our ambition and confidence to combat climate change. It is for everyone wanting to do their bit to protect our planet and create a secure future. TTH came to life in September 2011 and now runs several projects in Honiton. It is concerned with community togetherness, climate change, peak oil, resource depletion and the economic crisis.

This is all of us at our Seedy Saturday event during Climate Week in 2012. Hugh was passing by and popped in & was happy to have a photo taken with us.

TTH’s monthly Sustainable Saturday takes place on Saturday 2nd March and includes some added extras for Climate Week. The event will feature a Seed Giveaway and Plant Raffle as well as regular Waste Not Want Not stall and a clothes swap. Fairtrade Fortnight is also celebrated as all visitors are welcome to enjoy complimentary fairtrade tea and coffee all morning. Sustainable Saturday runs from 9am until midday at the Mackarness Hall. Join the Facebook events page here www.facebook.com/events/139629366204029
The second event to mark Climate Week in Honiton is a Bring & Share Supper on Saturday 9th March. This event is open to all members, supporters and future friends of Transition Town Honiton. Everyone is asked to bring a dish or two to share and their own drinks. Children are welcome and the event starts at 6pm at the Masonic Hall on Northcote Lane. We’ve set up a Facebook events page here www.facebook.com/events/506956252676718

TTH’s Climate Week event last year

Spring into action

Today was the vernal equinox and what better way to mark the start of spring than to plant lots of trees?  So that’s exactly what Honiton Community College’s Eco Council did, with a little help from TTH.  Hedgerow plants of hazel, holly and hawthorn from The Woodland Trust were planted in a double row to form a hedge along an existing fence line.  These plants will be tended over the coming years to ensure that they thrive and will provide food and shelter for wildlife in addition to sequestering carbon from the atmosphere.

Carrying trees, tools, tree guards and fertiliser up to the planting spot.

Carrying trees, tools, tree guards and fertiliser up to the planting spot.

Before planting, Mark Pollard of EDDC directed everyone where to plant, gave us a description of what we were planting and went over the method of planting a hedgerow.  The first job after this was to carry everything we needed from the entrance to The Glen up to the planting site.

To ensure that the young trees get the best possible start, a strip of grass was cleared and prepared as a bed to receive the hedgerow and give the trees a head start on the grasses and other plants.

Removing grass from a wide strip by the fence ready to receive the young trees.

Removing grass from a wide strip by the fence ready to receive the young trees.

As the planting process involved several stages, teams worked together to dig, plant, fertilise, cover and water each plant before placing a cane with them ready to take the tree guard.  Everyone got to have a go at each of the stages and it wasn’t too long before 100 trees had been planted.

Digging, planting, fertilising, watering....

Digging, planting, fertilising, watering....

Mark Pollard pacing the hedge to measure the length.

Mark Pollard pacing the hedge to measure the length.

In all, 100 young trees were planted covering a 30m length of fence.  Transition Town Honiton and the Eco Council have pledged to maintain the young trees over the coming years to help them during this early stage.  How nice to be able to return after many years to see a mature hedgerow and know that you played a part in it’s creation.

Honiton Community College's Eco Council with Transition Town Honiton volunteers under the guidance of Mark Pollard from EDDC.

Honiton Community College's Eco Council with Transition Town Honiton volunteers under the guidance of Mark Pollard from EDDC.